#inktober Day 2 – Graphic Novel Process- “The Meditation”

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Here you see my process at making graphic novels. First, I start with a comic board blank and mark some lines for panel shapes. The boards, or comic book paper, have marks on them to make it easier to create panels and to leave a border.

I then write in the words for each panel and move onto a separate pencil sketch page in a different sketchbook. Before doing it this way, I would just dive in and start drawing on the final page, but I have found that it works much better to have an idea of the final before drawing on the “good paper”.

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I sketch out very loosely the drawings I will put in each panel on tequilas sketch paper. This is so when I go to draw in the blue pencils on the “good paper”, I have a good working idea of how I want it to look.

On a large 14×17″ sheet of sketch paper, I can fit four “page sketches”. A page sketch is a small representation of a single full page in the final book. You can see this here. It is easier to change things when sketching and I am not too tied down to what I put in the image.

Since I have already placed the panels and words for each panel on the final drawing, I have an idea if the paneling to use when doing the sketches.

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After the sketches are done, I work on the blue pencils as shown below. I use blue pencils so that they will not be picked up by the scanner when I scan them in. There is a setting on the scanner that will only pick up darker lines. On my scanner, it is called “text” for some reason. Other scanner/computer combos may have it listed differently, but that is what I use. There are sliders that I can use when scanning to adjust the darkness to be picked up. Sometimes it will pick up the blue pencils if I put them in too darkly. I use Col-Erase pencils because they are easy to erase and lighten if I need to.

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After the pencils are drawn in, I have a guide for the inking process. I am using sign pens by Pentel which are sort of not the best option, but I like how easy they lay in the drawing. I can work quickly this way and get some good marks, even some thick to thin lines that are not usually available in inking pens. These pens were designed to be used for book signings, not book drawing, but I like the way they work.

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Above is the first pass at inking. The next step is correcting mistakes with whiteout and then I will add the lettering and scan it in. I’m not sure if I will use text on the computer for the words or write them by hand. I am pretty sure it will look way more professional if I type rather than write.

I will leave this as is for now and move onto figure drawing sketches tomorrow, followed by more face sketches the next day.

Thanks for following along with me this inktober.